Lady Athlyne

by Bram Stoker

Published Jun 18, 2014 by

Price: $0.99

(Price last checked: 10/09/2020, 6:36 PM)

3.3 out of 5 on Amazon with 2 ratings
In addition to the political changes that were occurring Finland made a huge social change. They were the first European country to give women the right to vote. This is vital to note since most nineteenth century literature places women under men when it comes to value. This is especially interesting to note due to the fact that Lady Athlyne is written in a manner that falls along the same lines as She and [Dracula]] when bringing forth the idea of, “The New Woman.” The woman does not follow the typical societal procedures (according to the novels). As such in these novels these types of women meet horrible ends. Therefore, the lessons in these two novels particularly share the concept that “The New Woman” goes against society. In Stoker’s novel Lady Athlyne he has a character that embodies traits of “The New Woman” which would be Joy’s aunt, Miss Judith Hayes. Miss Hayes ignores her brother in-law (Joy’s father) when he deems a visitor unacceptable for his daughter to associate with because her father finds the man suspicious.

Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.
Stoker had a strong interest in science and medicine and a belief in progress. Some of his novels like The Lady of the Shroud (1909) can be seen as early science fiction.
Stoker had an interest in the occult especially mesmerism, but was also wary of occult fraud and believed strongly that superstition should be replaced by more scientific ideas. In the mid-1890s, Stoker is rumoured to have become a member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, though there is no concrete evidence to support this claim. One of Stoker's closest friends was J.W. Brodie-Innis, a major figure in the Order, and Stoker himself hired Pamela Coleman Smith, as an artist at the Lyceum Theatre.

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